more food things from amolol

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amolol
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more food things from amolol

Postby amolol » Sun Nov 05, 2006 5:06 am

so in the spirit of the comming holiday i have decided to post more of my food recipies ideals thoughts and improvements

first order of buisiness.

cranberry sauce

my mother is not the worlds best cook. she relies on the canned cranberry sause to see us though the meal of thanks giving. i never liked cranberry sauce untill my girlfriends mother gave me her recipe. and now i share it with you all

ingredients:

2 lbs of cranberries

20 oz of honey (more or less may be needed depending on your taste preference)

2 oranges

1 quart of water

tools : a pot large enough for the ingredients. and a potato masher (one of the hand ones not a ricer or anything like that.

place the cranberries and water into the pot. peal the orange and remove all of translucent skin leaving only the little juice capsules. if you have payed attention to my previous thread there should be a post about fileting an orange if you cant find it send me an email and ill give you instructions. fileting the orange is a much much faster way of removing the skin.

let it summer on the stove to reduce, keep an eye on it because it will boil over. once the cranberries are mushy and the water is about half gone add the orange and set to mashing. once the cranberries are mashed ( i like to leave a few still hold for visual purposes) let it reduce again till it is about half in volume. it will be very liquidy and thats ok because it will set as it cools down. when it is cool enough to taste but not yet room temperature you should flavor the cranberries. i start with about 10 oz of honey and go from there. depending on the cranberries you may or may not need to add more. if you make it to sweet add lemon juice to counter it.


any questions can be sent to amolol@kona.pciwest.net
i dont know what your problem is, but i bet its hard to pronounce

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Postby Teshidee » Mon Nov 06, 2006 3:16 pm

hmm, how about the rest of the menue to go along? :D
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Postby Ambar » Mon Nov 06, 2006 4:15 pm

I need a good stuffing recipe, hurry it up! As it is I use pepprige farm seasoned bread cubes and add things like green pepper, onion, water chestnuts, chopped nuts (any kind), bouillon cubes (cause I bake it else I'd use drippings) ... what else can I add :)


and I think I'd gross out unless I streained the berries out .. *gag*
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Postby amolol » Tue Nov 07, 2006 8:56 am

i like the texture of the berries but feel free to strain it. if you do you should add some gelatin to thicken it. no it wont kill the taste gelatin has no taste.

as for stuffing i will see what i can come up with, i dont like stuffing so i dont have any recipies written down but ill check my books ask my grandmother ect ect.


as for the rest of the menu i can add greenbean casserole sweet potatoes mashed potatoes (or whipped) a good way to do prime rib or i could track down some of my ham recipies i will get ahold of my turkey rub recipe for youguys. im taking requests so feel free to ask
i dont know what your problem is, but i bet its hard to pronounce



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Postby Ambar » Tue Nov 07, 2006 11:18 am

prime rib on turkey day? no!

roast beef/yorkshire puddings on Christmas tho!

yep i do mashed sweet potatoes as well as russets

home made sweet potato pie far surpasses hoem made pumkin any day (my opinion of course!)

banana and pumpkin breads

waldorf salad .. green bean casserole

basically the last couple years i have cooked for just 3 or 4 people, but enough food to feed 20!

and i already bought the turkey for this year! must get the injector ingredients and peanut oil!!
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Postby amolol » Tue Nov 07, 2006 11:30 am

well some people do it. like my family on iocasion has been known to do ham turkey prime rib vennison bear elf and duck

but my family is full of hunters and farmers and there are alot of them.
i dont know what your problem is, but i bet its hard to pronounce



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Postby Ambar » Tue Nov 07, 2006 11:32 am

ooo venison stew or jerky are sooooo good, should post that one on the other thread!
"When a child is born, so is a grandmother."



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Postby amolol » Tue Nov 07, 2006 11:39 am

feel free to post it here... nobody watches that thread and would hate me for bringing it back :P
i dont know what your problem is, but i bet its hard to pronounce



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Postby Teshidee » Tue Nov 07, 2006 3:02 pm

waldorf salad makes me want to gag.... please no recipie!
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Postby Gormal » Tue Nov 07, 2006 3:12 pm

Ambar wrote:roast beef/yorkshire puddings on Christmas tho!
waldorf salad .. green bean casserole


Okay, what the hell do you know about Yorkshire puddings?! No one I've ever talked to has heard of them, but they're like my favorite local food from living in Britain (North Yorkshire). I'd love a good recipe for these, though I know you need molds.

Waldorf Salad... my mom always made this for me (I like it sans walnuts) but everyone thinks its gross because its got mayonaise in it. You get major points from me for your culinary tastes, Jen!
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Postby Vigis » Tue Nov 07, 2006 3:51 pm

amolol wrote:well some people do it. like my family on iocasion has been known to do ham turkey prime rib vennison bear elf and duck
.


Waiting for Ashiwi's comment...
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Postby Ashiwi » Tue Nov 07, 2006 4:03 pm

I don't have recipes because everything I do is from taste and experimentation, but for stuffing I usually use a mix of breads, wheat, white and rye. Toast them, of course, and chop them up on the coarse side. In a skillet lightly brown some sausage, either plain pork sausage or sage sausage (I keep sage on hand, so it's six of one, half of a dozen of the other, for me), and some diced onion, then drain. Peel and chop up apples (I prefer golden delicious, or a more tart Granny Smith, but that's just me), water chestnuts, and pecans, and a handful of celery. Season with parsley and some extra celery seed and a dash of sage, if you like. Throw that all in a bowl and hand mix with apple juice until it hits a sticky-crumbly consistency without being either dry or mushy. Stuff your turkey, and take what's extra and load the end of your turkey pan with it around the legs.

I've never made a less-than-perfectly-roasted turkey. I'm not trying to brag, there's just method to the turkey madness.

For your turkey, once it's stuffed, baste with butter, cover with aluminum foil, and put in the oven at around 350-375 degrees for the number of hours your poundage requires (a bit extra, if the instructions say to cook at over 400 degrees to begin with, but in the first hours I never bring the oven over 400). Pull out about once an hour and baste with more butter, but be sure to cover it up again before putting it back in the oven. Approximately half an hour before you pull the turkey out, strip it of foil, baste once with the pan juices, and crank the oven up to 450 degrees. Voila, perfectly moist turkey with a crisp, cracklin', golden skin. If you use the stuffing idea from above, the apple juice aroma will permeate the turkey and give the meat a hint of sweet flavor, and the butter baste and drippings complement the sausage and fruit stuffing very well.

Giblet gravy. Put the giblets in the pan next to the turkey and tuck aluminum foil around them. Don't remove that foil when you uncover the turkey for the final roast. Once the turkey is done, siphon off the drippings and chop up the giblets. In a skillet add a small amount of the fattier portion of the drippings and some flour , and stir constantly over heat to make your roux, then add the rest of the drippings slowly until you achieve your desired texture. You can always save a bit of the drippings to the side, in case you need to make more roux for it. Add well chopped up eggs (I tend to not just chop, but pulverize, and I use twice as many yolks as I do whites), and finely chopped giblets. Simmer to proper thickness, thinning or thickening with extra drippings as necessary. If you're one of those people who go totally bollux up on gravy, then my suggestion would be to put all your drippings in one pan and bring to a low boil, along with your chopped giblets and eggs, then add a cornstarch and cold water mixture slowly to the drippings until you get the texture you want. Roux is an art that took me years to perfect, and I used the cornstarch cheater for ages. I can still bollux up a good roux on occasion, even if Amolol described the steps for perfect gravy in detail, but if I'm careful with it I come out with some damned fine giblet gravy.

The biggest hint I can give you. If you want the traditional Thanksgiving or Christmas dinner, with the flavors that suggests, then use real butter, real cream, and other foods as close to their natural state as you can get. You can fudge on a lot of the side dishes to save time, but if you choose to use potato flakes instead of making mashed potatoes from scratch, you'll still be amazed what kind of difference you'll find if you use real butter in them instead of margarine.
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Postby Ambar » Tue Nov 07, 2006 4:14 pm

Gormal wrote:Okay, what the hell do you know about Yorkshire puddings?! No one I've ever talked to has heard of them, but they're like my favorite local food from living in Britain (North Yorkshire). I'd love a good recipe for these, though I know you need molds.


Lol my family on my mom's side are English and Irish, been having roast beef and yorkshire puddings since I was a baby .. you dont need molds, can use muffin tins, or can even make a huge one in a 9X13 inch pan

MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM greasy melt in your mouth lovliness :)


Yorkshire Pudding

¼ cup of drippings
½ cup milk
1 egg, well-beaten
½ cup sifted all-purpose flour
¼ teaspoon salt

Temp: 450º F Time: 10 - 15 min.

Now combine well-beaten egg and milk; beat till light. Gradually beat in sifted flour and salt; beat with dover beater till smooth. Let stand 30 minutes. (I personally don't bother with this letting stand 30 minutes step.)

Put about 2 tablespoons drippings into pan or divided up between 6 large muffin tins or into an 8"x8" pan. Heat in oven, make sure you watch pan as it will start to smoke! Pour batter into hot pan; bake in hot over till done. Serves 4.

The trick is the hot fat and the hot oven. Don't keep opening the oven to check. Serve immediately as it will deflate as it gets cold. Pour nice beef gravy over top. Or you can use "Yorkies" with chicken.

Just a google but looks right
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Postby Ashiwi » Tue Nov 07, 2006 4:19 pm

Vigis wrote:
amolol wrote:well some people do it. like my family on iocasion has been known to do ham turkey prime rib vennison bear elf and duck
.


Waiting for Ashiwi's comment...


I'm coming over for the holidays... you can lock your doors if you want, it won't matter to me.
Gormal tells you 'im a dwarven onion'
Gormal tells you 'always another beer-soaked layer'

Inama ASSOC:: 'though it may suit your fantasies to think so, i don't need oil for anything.'

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Postby Corth » Tue Nov 07, 2006 6:08 pm

Someone said prime rib?!? Heres a Corth original!

Take a 6 to 8 pound prime rib roast. Let it sit at room temperature for a couple of hours before cooking it. Coat it in olive oil and liberally spread around some salt, garlic powder, and pepper. Smoke it at around 200-225 degrees or so until internal temperture is, say 125 degrees (it MUST be rare!). For wood chips, use a mix of apple wood and mesquite... or as I like to call it, "mesquapple." When your done smoking it, stick it on a grill and sear it on the outside until its nice and caramelized. Let it sit for an hour or so at room temperature after its done cooking. That will do the trick!
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Postby amolol » Wed Nov 22, 2006 12:04 am

the turkey

first truss/cut/tie/mangle the turkey how you see fit. some people cook it all at once some cook the legs separate of the breasts/wings. I've always just trussed mine up tied it together and walla.

get some good evoo (extra virgin olive oil) and massage the turkey with it.. this does a few things. it makes sure that the oils penetrate the skin giving it that nice olive oil flavor, it makes a binder for the next step. and give you some time to make dirty jokes about massaging a dead bird with oil. (dont forget to do the inside aswell)

(wash hands here)

next in a separate bowl/jar/anything that will hold it, mix 7 parts kosher salt 1 part pepper 1 part rosemary 1 part thyme 1 part parsley 1 part garlic powder and 1 part onion powder. any amount is good just make sure you make equal parts.

after the seasoning is mixed rub it all over the birds body under the skin etc etc make sure you cover everything. insert more dirty jokes about rubbing on dead animals. (once again rub on the inside to, very liberally)

now follow the rest of traditional baking instructions.

some dos and don'ts of turkeys.

1 don't put a can of beer in the turkey. aluminimum is bad mmmmkay? pour the beer into several ramicans and place them in the turkey.

2 don't baste the turkey with any water based sauce this will dry the turkey out and no one likes dry meat. use the natural juices that the turkey makes or use oil canola oil grape oil ect ect the fat will lend to the moisture and flavor of the bird.

3 for the first part of the cooking don't cook the bird with the breasts up most of the fat in the turkey is in the back and spinal column. this will force the fat to run out of the back of the bird and you will have a drier less tasty product. cook the bird breast down so that the natural juices of the bird can flow through the body freely in the natural pathways that god or who/what ever has created this tasty belly filling sleep inducing morsel of yummy goodness. (in the last 15 minutes or so flip the bird and raise the temperature a little for that nice golden brown look we all desire.)

4 donot cook the stuffing inside of the bird this changes how the heat will affect the meat and it will cook less evenly and differently, if you put anything at all in the bird put a piece or two of onion and some cloves of garlic for aromatic flavor.

5 donot cook the bird fully in the oven stop it cooking when there is about 5 degrees to go. pull it ourt of the oven and wrap it in tin foil. this is called caryover cooking. it will give you a moister product. yes it makes a difference.

6 enjoy the farkin thing!
i dont know what your problem is, but i bet its hard to pronounce



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Postby amolol » Wed Nov 22, 2006 12:06 am

the rub i use is something that i made up on the spot with the cunning use of my tried and true knowledge of cooking. yes it will work yes it wilkl taste good. no you donot hafto use it. it is merly a suggestion of something to do. however you should at least rub the bird down with oil and use a little salt and pepper love on it. the rest of the herbs are optional.
i dont know what your problem is, but i bet its hard to pronounce



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Re: more food things from amolol

Postby Xisiqomelir » Wed Nov 22, 2006 2:02 am

Amolol, I want to buy one of those whole $60 cuts of tenderloin from Costco. What size of steaks should I cut off of it?
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Postby amolol » Wed Nov 22, 2006 3:22 am

honestly it is up to you and what your doing with it. if you are going for just steaks it will depend on your preference, there are ways to cut a steak for ease of cooking, for example if you like your steaks well done you should get them about an inch thick, if you like them medium about 1.5 inches if you like them rare go for a 2 inch thick cut. if you go for a thicker cut try and get a smaller whole cut thickness wise, sothat you dont end up with 24 or 32 oz steaks when you onle want 8-10 oz ones...

if you are wantinting to get some roasts out of it to i suggest getting them off of the ends where the meat will be slightly tougher. if your going for all roasts i suggest not getting anything that says round strip loin or tender anywhere in the phrase. those cuts do much better under dry heat and cook much quicker. go for a tougher cut marinade it a day or 2 ahead of time and braise it dont roast it... still comes out the same way save that it is much more tender and moist. so for steaks try and look for the above words for roasts avoid them and the thicker the steak the longer it will take to be done.

try not to cook a 2 inch thick steak well done because the longer you cook it the more juices will come out. so if you get a thinner steak it will take less time to cook and will be more tender and juicy :)

i hope that answered your question, it probably did plus a little more. sorry im long winded sometimes, glad i could help/confuse
i dont know what your problem is, but i bet its hard to pronounce



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Re: more food things from amolol

Postby Corth » Wed Nov 22, 2006 6:07 am

Xisiqomelir wrote:Amolol, I want to buy one of those whole $60 cuts of tenderloin from Costco. What size of steaks should I cut off of it?


Don't do it. Meat graded 'choice' is garbage. If your going to spend the money, get some prime tenderloin at a butcher. If its dry aged, all the better.

Also, 1.5 to 2 inches is about right for thickness.
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Postby Corth » Wed Nov 22, 2006 6:12 am

BTW, if anyone watches 'Top Chef' on Bravo, check out the contestant named Ilan. He is my brother's best friends. And while I am not really friends with him myself, I've known him since he was a little kid since he was basically attached to the hip with my brother. He is an awesomely talented chef, and so far one of the top three favorites to win the show.
Having said all that, the situation has been handled, so this thread is pretty much at an end. -Kossuth



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Postby Lilira » Wed Nov 22, 2006 5:08 pm

HELP!

Whats a nice wine that doesn't cost a fortune to go with turkey?

I'm an Arbor Mist kinda gal normally when I do drink wine.
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Postby amolol » Wed Nov 22, 2006 7:59 pm

thats kind of a rough one actually. turkey is a fairly strong flavor so if you can find a very light tasting red wine or a heavy white wine you can pair it that way a zinfandel would probably do you well if you can find a geed cheap one. you could try a pino grisio(sp) or a pino noir. desert should be served with an ice wine. the rest of the fixings should go well with all of the wines i mentiond. maybe someone with a better back ground could give you a hand.
i dont know what your problem is, but i bet its hard to pronounce



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Postby Lilira » Wed Nov 22, 2006 8:44 pm

I'll do what I normally do.. fake it. *grin* Thanks.
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Postby jalahon » Wed Nov 22, 2006 10:28 pm

Lilira - if u like Arbor Mist, then stick with a sweeter white - either reisling, viognier, or pinot grigio would go well with turkey and each can be found cheaply in the magnum size. If you're feeling adventurous, I'd suggest a pinot blanc - usually a nice smokey, slightly sweet white wine that would match up great.
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Postby linsow » Wed Nov 22, 2006 10:37 pm

listen to what jalahon said.... i should take some wine courses.
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Postby amolol » Thu Nov 23, 2006 3:36 am

say on linsows comp... heh
i dont know what your problem is, but i bet its hard to pronounce



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Postby Teralyn » Thu Nov 23, 2006 5:54 am

I'm brining my turkey this year. Stole the idea from my chef who did it last year and said it came out amazing. It's a bit late for anyone to try it, but I'll give you the recipie anyways...

Tools you'll need: a large pot (possibly a 3-4 gallon), a large plastic lexan/cambro (a plastic container that holds aprox 16 quarts of liquid and has a top.

Ingredients:
2.5-3 gallons of water
lots of kosher salt (I'd say at least 4 cups)
5 sprigs of rosemary
2 ounces of thyme
2 ounces of sage
20 whole pepper corns
10 cloves of crushed garlic
1.5 orange - sliced (don't bother peeling it)
approx. 2 cups of honey

Combine all ingredients into large pot and bring to a boil. Let boil for about 15 minutes. remove from head, pour into large lexan/cambro. Stick into fridge and let cool completely. Once cooled, drop your turkey into the brine. Slap the lid on, put back in fridge and let sit over night. Next day, take the turkey out, and roast/smoke/deep-fry/cook/bake/mangle/destroy/butcher, whatever you normally do (assuming you are following the correct steps to prepare a descent turkey), it should be juicy and flavorful!
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Postby Ambar » Thu Nov 23, 2006 2:14 pm

Inject turkey with cajun seasoning, deep fry turkey in peanut oil for 3 -4 minutes per pound

scrumptious and soooo bad for you!!!

I'm a Yankee living in Virginia, had never heard of deep fried turkey til about 6 years ago our Chiefs made it for us .. ever since then I hasve deep fried it ...
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