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Some simple things to avoid to not KILL your family...

Posted: Fri Mar 18, 2011 10:22 pm
by Thilindel
These go hand in hand with rl experience so far in EMS/Trauma:
Owning any of these could be fatal for you or your family: Writing to let you guys see...of which I've personally seen 19 fatalities among them altogether (On scene and before med/surg) - at least watch the intro of any of these before thinking it's not worth you or your family's time.


(VAN) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b9WAaAKT8W8

(VAN) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSbTzYuv_qI

(VAN) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bwCy5ajhU0c


(TRUCK) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oTbA0fhBark (Very bad outcomes in these)

(TRUCK) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-gpi3cS0zw

(CAR) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dI2ctRRtQXo ***Believe it or not, even the Crown Vic!***

Re: Some simple things to avoid to not KILL your family...

Posted: Mon Mar 21, 2011 8:32 pm
by Corth
Thanks Thil. Good to know.

Re: Some simple things to avoid to not KILL your family...

Posted: Tue Mar 22, 2011 6:08 pm
by Teflor Lyorian
The offset, 40 mph IIHS crash is only typical of much less than one percent of automotive crashes. Furthermore, the crash simulates an offset collision with another vehicle of similar mass (so, the bigger the vehicle, the harder the test is).

In the end, you can take any vehicle, spin it up to some speed that will defeat all structural reinforcement of the passenger cabin. And if you test a big truck by simulating a crash with another big truck, of course you're going to get some dramatic effects.

HOW this may become misleading is that a massive truck with a marginal rating is still MOST likely safer than a compact car with a good rating in an offset crash.



That being said, you have roughly a 1 in 7000 chance of being killed in a car crash each year you drive, with lifetime odds approaching 1%. If you can afford safety, you might as well spend on it.

Re: Some simple things to avoid to not KILL your family...

Posted: Thu Mar 24, 2011 5:55 pm
by Thilindel
When it comes to statistics that involve life, I find personal experience being most reliable. When one is driving, the option in which impact and (the other) driver's speed is in consideration. With frequency of cell phone use while driving is -my- personal experience as to the cause of these accidents, which are more often than not, offset. Someone veering into the next lane is not something I'd want chance. The hospital's source, per the government, frontal impacts [(+/-)30 degree] are as follows:

22% involve a barrier
34% left to right offset
35% right to left offset

The problem with blanket statistics, is lack of grouping availability. Think of how many parking lot fender benders are included in the mix with 'car accident'. This original post was with the notion of driving your family or yourself on the highway. Clearly, fender benders do not require ALS responding. But most statistics available report generic car accidents, as defined bumping another in a parking lot. When you think about it, 40 mph is not hard at all to make. If you are driving 20 mph, and the oncoming is as well...there's your 40 mph. The entire point that is clear is that certain makes of vehicles are absolutely prone in these scenarios, yet other makes never have been. Nor does this address Chrysler's infamy in seat belts/car seat anchoring. Of accidents -requiring- BLS/ALS, offset are considerably valid cause when speaking of MVAs.

Either way, I don't want a debate. If anyone here has or had lost someone they loved because of a car's lacking structural integrity, when most vehicles do not face such deficit, then it's little consolation to cite any statistics at all. SH*T happens. Regardless of one's driving skills, warding the idiocy of 'the other driver' is not an option. I am anxious to see the cell phone involvement on true scale. Texting and web-surfing while driving are definitely on the rise...for some, as technology increases, users' wisdom decreases :(